The Artist's Studio: Lady Hazel Lavery with her Daughter Alice and Stepdaughter Eileen

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John Lavery (1856-1941), The Artist's Studio: Lady Hazel Lavery with her Daughter Alice and Stepdaughter Eileen, 1909-13
Creation Date: 
Circa 1909
Creator(s): 
(1856 - 1941)
Classification: 
Materials: 
Dimensions: 
Heigth: 
344.00
Width: 
274.00
Units: 
cm
Copyright: 
© National Gallery of Ireland
Country of Origin: 

Stories

Keating and Lavery

John Lavery (1856-1941), The Artist's Studio: Lady Hazel Lavery with her Daughter Alice and Stepdaughter Eileen, 1909-13

Lavery Portrait

Born in Belfast and trained in Glasgow, London and Paris, John Lavery settled in London , where he established himslef as a celebrated portraitist. His sitters included leading figures of international society as well as British royalty. This impressively large portrait depicts the artist's wife Hazel, her daughter Alice from her first marriage and his daughter Eileen by his first wife. The painting was begun in his London studio in 1909. Hazel Lavery is fashionably dressed in a feathered turban and richly coloured silk and satin Paisley coat. Alice is seated in a basket chair while Eileen leans gracefully across the grand piano. The family dog, Rodney Stone, lies at the feet of the two girls. In the background Ayisha, the maid, is seen entering the room bearing a salver of fruits. Also visible in the portrait is the artist himself. Reflected in a mirror, his palette and brush clearly visible, Lavery paints himself studying the group of figures he is portraying.

The painting is striking for its sense of immence space, the modelling of the figures in light and shade, the fluid handling of paint and its eye-catching colourful passages.

The composition is based on Las Meninas by Velasquez, a painter much admired by Lavery. The grouping of the figures in the fore-ground, the reflection of the artist in the distant mirror, the position of the dog and, above all, the scale of the interior, recall Velasquez's famous painting of 1656.

(National Gallery of Ireland: Essential Guide, 2008)

Keating and Lavery

John Lavery (1856-1941), The Artist's Studio: Lady Hazel Lavery with her Daughter Alice and Stepdaughter Eileen, 1909-13

Lavery’s grand family portrait

Born in Belfast and trained in Glasgow, London and Paris, John Lavery settled in London , where he established himslef as a celebrated portraitist. His sitters included leading figures of international society as well as British royalty. This impressively large portrait depicts the artist's wife Hazel, her daughter Alice from her first marriage and his daughter Eileen by his first wife. The painting was begun in his London studio in 1909. Hazel Lavery is fashionably dressed in a feathered turban and richly coloured silk and satin Paisley coat. Alice is seated in a basket chair while Eileen leans gracefully across the grand piano. The family dog, Rodney Stone, lies at the feet of the two girls. In the background Ayisha, the maid, is seen entering the room bearing a salver of fruits. Also visible in the portrait is the artist himself. Reflected in a mirror, his palette and brush clearly visible, Lavery paints himself studying the group of figures he is portraying.

The painting is striking for its sense of immence space, the modelling of the figures in light and shade, the fluid handling of paint and its eye-catching colourful passages.

The composition is based on Las Meninas by Velasquez, a painter much admired by Lavery. The grouping of the figures in the fore-ground, the reflection of the artist in the distant mirror, the position of the dog and, above all, the scale of the interior, recall Velasquez's famous painting of 1656.

(National Gallery of Ireland: Essential Guide, 2008)

Highlights of the National Gallery of Ireland

John Lavery (1856-1941), The Artist's Studio: Lady Hazel Lavery with her Daughter Alice and Stepdaughter Eileen, 1909-13

Purple-dark room with three ladies

This painting makes you think you are looking into a stranger's bedroom, maybe your parents' when you lived in that little town where you attended to school, or maybe your ninety-eight-year-old moody neightbour's when she was younger and spoke perfect Russian. There is a feeling of veiled-in-velvet secrets, of dust-covered books on travellers, of a theatrical woman seeking happiness. I like the way each lady secretly stares at the painting man, as if they had to be shown in a different way, just for a different look, as if that day, the clouds, the appointments, the things they used to love and abhor could last forever. Kept in that room, in that frame.

This object story contains no events.

Not in any dossier

John Lavery (1856-1941), The Artist's Studio: Lady Hazel Lavery with her Daughter Alice and Stepdaughter Eileen, 1909-13

Untitled 100

This object story contains no events.

Highlights of the National Gallery of Ireland

John Lavery (1856-1941), The Artist's Studio: Lady Hazel Lavery with her Daughter Alice and Stepdaughter Eileen, 1909-13

What happened to Alice....

I went to school with her son, Robin McEnnery, at Clongowes in the 1950s. I could see a strong family resemblance.

This object story contains no events.

Highlights of the National Gallery of Ireland

John Lavery (1856-1941), The Artist's Studio: Lady Hazel Lavery with her Daughter Alice and Stepdaughter Eileen, 1909-13

The lady on the pound note

This painting is like a trigger for my love story. My late husband frequently would say to people (not too frequently, just enough), that my wife reminds me of the woman on the pound note. This painting gives me a great feeling of warmth and happiness when I look at it as it reminds me of my late husband.

This object story contains no events.

Highlights of the National Gallery of Ireland

John Lavery (1856-1941), The Artist's Studio: Lady Hazel Lavery with her Daughter Alice and Stepdaughter Eileen, 1909-13

Lavery’s grand family portrait

Born in Belfast and trained in Glasgow, London and Paris, John Lavery settled in London , where he established himslef as a celebrated portraitist. His sitters included leading figures of international society as well as British royalty. This impressively large portrait depicts the artist's wife Hazel, her daughter Alice from her first marriage and his daughter Eileen by his first wife. The painting was begun in his London studio in 1909. Hazel Lavery is fashionably dressed in a feathered turban and richly coloured silk and satin Paisley coat. Alice is seated in a basket chair while Eileen leans gracefully across the grand piano. The family dog, Rodney Stone, lies at the feet of the two girls. In the background Ayisha, the maid, is seen entering the room bearing a salver of fruits. Also visible in the portrait is the artist himself. Reflected in a mirror, his palette and brush clearly visible, Lavery paints himself studying the group of figures he is portraying.

The painting is striking for its sense of immence space, the modelling of the figures in light and shade, the fluid handling of paint and its eye-catching colourful passages.

The composition is based on Las Meninas by Velasquez, a painter much admired by Lavery. The grouping of the figures in the fore-ground, the reflection of the artist in the distant mirror, the position of the dog and, above all, the scale of the interior, recall Velasquez's famous painting of 1656.

(National Gallery of Ireland: Essential Guide, 2008)